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Social and Behavioral Sciences Course Descriptions

History

*GER Approved Course

*His 101: Survey of World Civilization I – 3 credit hours

The development of world civilizations from the earliest times to the Age of Exploration, emphasizing the main events, people, and ideas shaping each civilization and the corresponding events and ideas in the non-Western world and the inter-relationships among various civilizations. Fulfills Global History requirement.

*His 102: Survey of World Civilization II – 3 credit hours

The development of world civilizations from the Age of Exploration to the present, emphasizing the main events, people, and ideas shaping each civilization and the corresponding events and ideas in the non-Western world and the inter-relationships among civilizations. Fulfills Global History requirement.

*His 201: History of the United States I – 3 credit hours

Social, cultural, and political history of the U.S. from colonial times to the Civil War.

*His 202: History of the United States II – 3 credit hours

Social, cultural, and political history of the U.S. from the Civil War to the present.

*His 205: Race, Ethnicity and Migration – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the historical role of race, ethnicity, and migration in the U.S. and a transnational history that explores the homelands of immigrants, the causes of emigration, and the transnational migration networks bringing migrants to America. The course also covers immigration, acculturation and assimilation, and the creation and evolution of ethnic conclaves in the U.S. Roughly 60% of the course addresses global history; in addition, obstacles to assimilation in the U.S. and constructed ideas about what it means to be American are covered. This course fills a general education requirement (GER) in the global history/Social and Behavioral Sciences area. Prerequisite: Member of the Honors College.

*His 205H: Race, Ethnicity, and Migration – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the historical role of race, ethnicity, and migration in the U.S. and a transnational history that explores the homelands of immigrants, the causes of emigration, and the transnational migration networks bringing migrants to America. The course also covers immigration, acculturation and assimilation, and the creation and evolution of ethnic conclaves in the U.S. Roughly 60% of the course addresses global history; in addition, obstacles to assimilation in the U.S. and constructed ideas about what it means to be American are covered. This course fills a general education requirement (GER) in the global history/social and behavioral sciences area. Open ONLY to Honors College students

*His 311: Diplomatic History of the U.S. to 1914 – 3 credit hours

Major issues in U.S. diplomatic history from the American Revolution to the eve of World War I; emphasis on American expansion and rise to world power. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 312: Diplomatic History of the U.S. Since 1914 – 3 credit hours

Analysis of major problems and issues in U.S. diplomatic history from 1914 to the present. Topics include U.S.-Soviet relationship; American response to revolutions in Russia, China, and Mexico; the Vietnam War; American policy in the Middle East and Central America. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 316: England: 1485-1815 – 3 credit hours

Study of the Renaissance and Reformation in England; the emergence of England as a first-rate colonial and political power. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or instructor permission.

*His 317: History of Russia to 1917 – 3 credit hours

Covers the social, political, economic, and cultural development of Russia from earliest times to 1917. Particular consideration is given to Russian expansionism, the rise of absolutism and of serfdom, and the impact on Russia of various foreign cultures: Byzantine, Mongol, and Western. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 318: 19th Century Europe – 3 credit hours

A study of the political, social, cultural development of Europe from the fall of Napoleon to 1914. Topics include ideological struggles; liberalism versus conservatism; nationalism; unification of Germany and Italy; industrialization; response of intellectuals to industrialization; expansion of Europe overseas; the Age of Bismarck; and alliance systems. Fulfills Global History requirement. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 320: Europe Since 1914 – 3 credit hours

Analysis of Europe from 1914 to the present day. Topics include the world wars; rise of fascism and communism; revolution in Russia; intellectual and cultural developments; the collapse of communism and of the Soviet Union; the Common Market; and prospects for European unity. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 325: World War II – 3 credit hours

This course is an upper-division global history of the Second World War. It begins with the collapse of the international peace initiatives following World War I during the Great Depression and concludes with the resurrection of such initiatives in the advent of the atomic age. While the European theater (including the war in Western Europe, the Mediterranean, and Eastern Europe) is a major part of the course, covering about a third of the course material, the rest of the course will cover the Pacific Theater (China, Japan, Australia, and the Pacific islands campaigns), the Indian Ocean theaters (Middle East, India, Burma, Malaysia), and the Latin American and southern African theaters. This course is an upper-division global history of the Second World War. It begins with the collapse of the international peace initiatives following World War I during the Great Depression and concludes with the resurrection of such initiatives in the advent of the atomic age. While the European theater (including the war in Western Europe, the Mediterranean, and Eastern Europe) is a major part of the course, covering about a third of the course material, the rest of the course will cover the Pacific Theater (China, Japan, Australia, and the Pacific islands campaigns), the Indian Ocean theaters (Middle East, India, Burma, Malaysia), and the Latin American and southern African theaters.

*His 330: History of Women in America – 3 credit hours

Analysis of the various roles women have played in American life from colonial times to the present and of the ideas and theories regarding women’s proper place. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 332: The Middle East – 3 credit hours

This course covers the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the present day. Topics include the life and teaching of Muhammad, Islamic Civilization, the Christian West and Islam, rise of nationalism, Israel, modernization, terrorism, and current issues. Fulfills Global History requirement. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 333: History of Ancient Greece and Rome – 3 credit hours

A survey of Greek and Roman history from the beginning in Ancient Greece through the Christianizing of the Roman Empire. Emphasis on political and cultural evolution. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 334: History of the Renaissance and Reformation – 3 credit hours

Culture and society in Europe between 1300–1600. Topics include problems of the medieval church and state, the waning of the Middle Ages, artistic achievements, early voyages of discovery, the Protestant Reformation, and the Catholic Counter Reformation. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 339: History of Christianity to 1648 – 3 credit hours

Survey of Christianity from apostolic times through the Reformation with particular emphasis on the role of Christianity in the political, cultural, and moral development of the West. Topics include the early Church Fathers, impact of Islam, medieval papacy, Luther, and Calvin. Fulfills Global History requirement. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*His 340: Religious History of the American People – 3 credit hours

A study of historical origins and development of religion in America from colonial times to the present. Major themes include successive immigrant groups and their religious beliefs, leaders, and institutions; the response of religion to major problems in American history; and the development of mainstream and marginal religious movements. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

His 341: History of Kentucky – 3 credit hours

This course is divided into two parts: a study of the social and physical geography of the seven regions of Kentucky and of the development of each region and its unique culture; and the history of the state of Kentucky from pre-Revolutionary War explorations to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the skills and knowledge for elementary teachers of Kentucky history. Prerequisite: History 201 or 202.

*His 342: Latin America Since Independence –  3 credit hours

A study of Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries with special emphasis on Central America, Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil. Topics include the Spanish heritage, the achievement of independence, the quest for identity after independence, democracy vs. authoritarianism, and economic dependence and modernization. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

His 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

His 495: Practicum – 3 credit hours

Students apply their knowledge and skills in a supervised off-campus setting such as a museum, archives, or government agency. The student works a minimum of 120 hours for the semester, meets regularly with the area coordinator, and submits written materials reflecting her/his work experience. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of instructor.

His 499: History Seminar – 3 credit hours

This is a required capstone course for history majors. Students read and discuss historical works, present a research paper, and master research skills including the use of computer resources. Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of instructor.

Political Science

*GER Approved Course

*Pls 100: Introduction to Political Science – 3 credit hours

Overview of the discipline, including the basic theories, concepts, and approaches of political science; provides students with a foundation of knowledge and analytical skills necessary to understand modern politics in historical context. For the students majoring in PS, this course provides a basis for choosing their direction of study within the discipline.

*Pls 201: American Government – 3 credit hours

Introduction to the government and political system of the United States, including a study of the values and principles of the U.S. federal system of government, the role of public opinion, the media, voter participation, political parties and interest groups, the institutions of government, and selected issues of public policy.

Pls 207: Current Political Issues – 3 credit hours

Study of current political issues, reflecting the trends in the domestic and international environments. The topics discussed include but are not limited to: economic policy, human rights, civil liberties, social policy, foreign policy, international conflict and cooperation, demographics and immigration, and environmental protection.

Pls 210: Introduction to the American Legal System – 3 credit hours

Overview of the U.S. legal system, including the U.S. Constitution, judicial branch, and the courts at all levels of government, and their roles in the U.S. legal system. This course informs students in regards to requirements and expectations of law school and careers in law. Prerequisites: Eng 102 and Sph 110.

*Pls 215: Introduction to International Relations – 3 credit hours

Introduction to international politics, including geographic, demographic, economic, and political factors conditioning the behavior of international actors. Students will study the theoretical framework in which current developments can be analyzed, and familiarize themselves with the most pertinent international issues.

*Pls 250: Politics and Social Issues – 3 credit hours

Exploration of current domestic and international social problems. Students will examine historical and political development, theoretical approaches, social movements, and legal processes that influenced those issues and their impact on the society. This course aims to show students how individuals shape the quality of social justice.

Pls 302: History of Political Thought – 3 credit hours

Introduction to historical and theoretical developments of political thought from ancient Greeks to the 21st century scholars. Students will analyze the impact and application of political philosophy on the current political systems and ideologies worldwide.

Pls 303: Comparative Political Systems – 3 credit hours

Introduction to the theoretical approaches in the study of comparative politics. Students will compare the nature of governance and society in various types of domestic systems, accounting for history, political institutions, culture, economic policy, and civil rights and liberties. Prerequisite: Pls 200, Pls 201, or permission of the instructor.

Pls 304: United States Foreign Policy – 3 credit hours

Introduction to U.S. foreign policy, including historical and international contexts and decision-making processes. The past, current, and future U.S. foreign policies and the mechanisms through which the U.S. influences international dynamics are explored and evaluated. Prerequisite: Pls 201 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 310: Public Administration – 3 credit hours

Survey of concepts and practices related to public administration in the U.S., including the discipline and political context of governmental administration, organization theory, human resources management, intergovernmental relations, budgetary processes, and public service ethics. Prerequisite: Pls 201 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 311: Ethics in Public Administration – 3 credit hours

Examination of the relationship between ethical choices and decisions of public administrators. Ethical standards are discussed in light of organizational and public policies. Prerequisite: Pls 310 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 313: State and Local Government – 3 credit hours

Introduction of the fundamentals of local and state government systems, including their structures, administration, laws, policies, and decision-making processes. Furthermore, the relationships among various levels of government and between citizens and governments are analyzed. Prerequisite: Pls 201 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 330: Political Campaigns, Elections, and Public Opinion – 3 credit hours

Introduction to the nature of the electoral system and political campaigns in the U.S. national, state, and local levels, including campaign strategies, financing and its reform, the psychology of voters, the importance of public opinion, and the role of parties in the processes of campaigns and elections. Prerequisite: Pls 201 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not a part of the regular curriculum. It is offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

Pls 400: International Relations – 3 credit hours

Exploration and application of theories relevant to understanding modern world affairs, including positivist and post-positivist theories, global political economy, interdependence, causes of war, conflict and cooperation, international institutions, and decision making processes. Prerequisite: Pls 215 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 402: American Political Thought – 3 credit hours

Overview of the main trends and controversies in U.S. political thought from the country’s founding to

the present, including political ideologies and their development over time, the proper role of the government in various areas of policy, the relationship between citizens and their government, federalism, collective identity, political leaders, and political discourse. Prerequisite: Pls 100 and Pls 201, or permission of the instructor.

Pls 403: Public Policy – 3 credit hours

Introduction to the study of public policy, including an overview of functions, responsibilities, decisions, and activities involved in determining public policy, from the agenda stage to the selection, implementation, and evaluation of policies. Theoretical and practical approaches to evaluate case studies in order to better understand this essential government function will be used. Prerequisite: Pls 100 or Pls 201.

Pls 405: Research Methods – 3 credit hours

Introduction to the scientific method, types of research, and forms of research design used in Political Science field. Students will learn how to evaluate the research of others and how to effectively construct and execute their own research inquires in a methodical and rigorous manner. Prerequisites: Junior status and Mth 250. Psy 405 may be substituted.

*Pls 411: American Constitutional Law – 3 credit hours

Examination of the development of U.S. constitutional law, its impact on government and society, and methods of constitutional analysis, including the role of the Supreme Court in the establishment of rights and liberties, the process and influence of judicial review, federalism, and the relationships between the functional branches of government. Prerequisite: Pls 201 or permission of the instructor.

Pls 495: Political Science Internship – 1-9 credit hours

With permission of the PS Area Coordinator, internships in a related field are available to students with high grade point average. The internship is administered by the Area Coordinator or the student’s Academic Advisor. To earn one (1) credit hour, student must complete forty (40) hours of work. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of the instructor.

Pls 499: Political Science Seminar – 3 credit hours

This capstone course ties together the practical and theoretical elements of the Political Science major, asking students to synthesize and apply the knowledge and skills they have gained over the course of their learning in Political Science. Prerequisite: Junior status and at least twenty-four (24) Political Science credit hours earned.

Psychology

*GER Approved Course

*Psy 105: Introduction to Psychology – 3 credit hours

A survey of the main fields of psychology: the history and methods of psychology, the nervous and endocrine systems, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, higher cognitive processes, developmental psychology, motivation, emotion, stress, personality theory, sexuality, intelligence, psychological testing, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, social psychology, and applied psychology.

*Psy 201: Women and Psychology – 3 credit hours

This course places women at the center of psychological inquiry by focusing on the developmental and social psychology of women. It encourages integration of ideas, feelings, and behaviors. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

*Psy 230: Women and Men: Their Relationships – 3 credit hours

This course examines gender roles in contemporary society, focusing on how these roles affect relationships; it encourages student exploration of the psychological and social issues pertinent to development of relationships. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.

Psy 250: Applied Behavior Analysis – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the application of basic behavior principles to human behavior. Basic principles of reinforcement punishment, extinction, and stimulus control as they relate to normal behavior, behavior disorders, education, industrial settings, and child rearing will be discussed. Students must complete a class project using the principles learned in the class. Prerequisite: Psy 105.

*Psy 260: Social Psychology – 3 credit hours

Conformity, mass communication, propaganda, persuasion, social cognition, self-justification, human aggression, prejudice, liking, loving, interpersonal sensitivity, and social psychology as a science.

Psy 270: Cognitive Psychology – 3 credit hours

An in-depth survey of the fields of cognitive psychology: physiological, sensation, perception, learning, memory, language, and cognition. Prerequisite: Psy 105.

*Psy 300: Developmental Psychology – 3 credit hours

A study of human growth and development from conception to death. The course deals with physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and personality development at all age levels, and the respective theories; the effects of heredity and environment on the developmental process. Prerequisite: Psy 105 or permission of instructor.

Psy 303: Introduction to Counseling – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the theories and practices of contemporary personal, marriage, academic, and vocational counseling. Emphasis is placed on facilitative responses, listening, and other helping skills. Includes taped counseling interviews, case studies, and role-playing. Prerequisites: Psy 105 or equivalent; junior status.

Psy 350: Abnormal Psychology – 3 credit hours

Abnormal psychopathology, including mental disorders, their treatment, models accounting for psychopathology, and community health programs. Prerequisite: Psy 105.

*Psy 360: Psychology of Addictions – 3 credit hours

An overview of the analysis of current thinking about the nature, scope, causes, identification, and consequences of various types of addictions: nicotine, alcohol, legal and illegal drugs, gambling, etc. Treatment issues and the use of self-help groups are covered. Prerequisite: Psy 105 or instructor permission.

Psy 365: Personality Theory – 3 credit hours

An examination of the most prominent personality theories in terms of their origins, influence on contemporary psychological thought, and relevance to psychology as a human science. Prerequisites: Psy 105 and junior status with at least 9 credit hours in psychology.

Psy 370: Topics in Psychology – 3 credit hours

Various topics in psychology will be taught on a rotating basis, in response to student needs and interests. Topics include (but are not limited to) Health Psychology, Sports Psychology, Forensic Psychology, Psychopharmacology, Human Genetics, Cognitive Rehabilitation, Environmental Psychology, and Psychology of Religion. Course may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Psy 105.

Psy 380: Biopsychology – 3 credit hours

An overview of the structure and function of the human nervous system as it affects human processes such as memory, emotions, learning, and psychopathology; also covered are the effects of brain damage on behavior. Prerequisite: Psy 105 or permission of instructor.

Psy 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

Psy 405: Research Methods – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the scientific method and the various types of research. Students will develop research proposals. Prerequisites: Psy 105 or equivalent; Mth 250; junior status with at least 12 credit hours in psychology.

Psy 406: History and Systems of Psychology – 3 credit hours

Begins with psychology’s origins in philosophy and covers various schools of psychology, the development of experimental psychology, the influence of psychoanalysis on psychology, and trends in humanistic psychology. Recommended: Psy 105 and junior/senior status.

Psy 410: Psychological Testing – 3 credit hours

Introduction to psychological testing, including basic statistical considerations and ability, achievement, intelligence, and personality tests. Prerequisites: Mth 250; Psy 105 and 270.

Psy 490: Senior Research Project – 1-6 credit hours

This course is the culmination and the practical application of materials from the statistics and research methods courses. Under supervision, the student begins and completes a research project, including a proposal, pilot study, and/or a full research project, data analysis, and a complete report in accordance with current APA style manual. (Strongly recommended for students planning graduate work.) This course may be repeated up to six credit hours. Prerequisites: Psy 105, 270, 405; Mth 250; and permission of instructor.

Psy 495: Field Experience – 3 credit hours

Supervised work experience with no classroom instruction. Prerequisites: Psy 105, 365, and junior/senior status. Recommended: Psy 303.

Psy 499: Psychology Seminar – 3 credit hours

Readings and discussions designed to help senior psychology majors synthesize their studies in the field. Prerequisite: Senior status. Recommended: Psy 365.

The following courses are open ONLY to Psychology with Emphasis in Addictions Counseling Majors (unless with permission of Student Advisor and/or Course Instructor):

Psy 220A: Addictions and the Family – 3 credit hours

This course introduces the student to individual and group dynamics present within the family in which various addictions exist. Family systems and personality issues are presented and applied to the treatment of the family as a unit. Theoretical and practical aspects of counseling are presented and cover the active phases of addiction and the early stages of recovery. The issue of co-dependent family relationships is also discussed and explored. Prerequisites: Psy 105 and 360.

Psy 240A: Ethics and Professional Responsibility – 3 credit hours

This course explores the ethical, legal, and behavioral issues facing the counselor and the addictions counselor in particular. State laws are discussed with an emphasis on the distinctions between the legal versus ethical responsibilities of the counselor. Students will also learn about confidentiality rules and regulations; clients’ rights and responsibilities; codes of ethics; and avenues for addressing ethical dilemmas or problems that arise in a variety of clinical, supervisory, and consultative settings. Prerequisites: Psy 105 and 360.

Psy 310A: Group Addictions Counseling – Theory and Practice – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the theory and practice related to the dynamics of group interaction and the facilitator functions of the counselor. This course emphasizes the management of group processes as a method of behavioral change. Although the theories of group processes are covered, the emphasis is on students participating as both members and facilitators in group process, providing a strong experiential component to this course. Prerequisite: Psy 105, 303, and 360.

Psy 320A: Behavioral Psychopharmacology – 3 credit hours

This course emphasizes the specific action and physical and behavioral effects of various psychoactive substances (including alcohol) on the human brain and body. Also covered are the pharmacological and physiological implications: dependence, tolerance, and habituation. The course also focuses on the role of pharmacological therapy as a component of current abuse and addictions treatment. Prerequisites: Psy 105 and 360.

Psy 340A: Crisis and Brief Interventions Counseling – 3 credit hours

Effective crisis and brief interventions counseling skills for use in community-based behavioral/psychiatric health settings are discussed and practiced. Topics discussed and covered include working with violent, disruptive, or suicidal clients; anger and stress management; reframing negative behaviors; goal setting; and teaching targeted coping skills. Prerequisites: Psy 105, 303, and 360.

Psy 400A: Screening, Assessment and Treatment Planning – 3 credit hours

This course covers the application of multi-modal assessments and treatment planning processes utilized within addiction and other mental health settings. Other topics covered include uniform patient placement criteria, co-occurring psychiatric and medical disorders, functional and strengths-based approaches, and outcome measures and documentation. Prerequisite: Senior Status or advisor permission.

Psy 420A: Case Management and Documentation – 3 credit hours

This course focuses on written communication skills utilized as a professional addictions counselor. Students will learn the 12 core functions of their profession, how to use the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) patient placement criteria, and how to communicate effectively and professionally with third-party payers. Students will also become familiar with the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) requirements for admissions, treatment planning, and daily charting. Visits to facilities that offer addictions services may be required. Prerequisite: Psy 400A.

Psy 430A: Recovery and Relapse Prevention Methods – 3 credit hours

This course surveys theories and methods of preventing relapse and promoting recovery from psychiatric and substance abuse disorders. The topics covered include definition of recovery, high-risk situations, community education, incorporation of spirituality in recovery, and twelve-step programs. Prerequisite: Psy 410A.

Psy 440A: Field Placement Seminar and Practice I – 3 credit hours

This field placement is an opportunity for a student to document at least 100 hours working at an agency directly in the field of addictions, along with a one-hour weekly meeting with faculty sponsor. The student functions under agency supervision to gain case management experience that may include working with individuals, couples and/or families, as well as groups. [NOTE: Those seeking CADC certification must document their hours of supervised field experience. These hours apply to the additional hours required for state/national credentialing.] Prerequisites: Senior status; advisor permission.

Psy 450A: Field Placement Seminar and Practice II – 3 credit hours

This field placement experience continues the development of knowledge and skills begun in Field Placement Seminar and Practice I. Focus is on developing more independence and skills in both individual and group counseling. In the seminar, students will demonstrate professional readiness through skills in the areas of the core competencies. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Psy 440A.