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Mathematics and Natural Sciences Course Descriptions

Biology

*GER Approved Course

*Bio 100: Introduction to Biology – 3 credit hours

Basic principles of biological science with special emphasis on human biology. Selected topics of current interest and laboratory experiences are included. NOT OPEN TO BIOLOGY MAJORS.

*BIO 104H: Scourge and Cure: The Science behind the American Drug Culture – 3 credit hours

This Honors College course will bring a focus to corporate and individual efforts to provide pharmaceuticals to American consumers. The scientific processes for drug development and control will be examined. Guest experts. An overnight field trip will supplement lecture and discussion. This course fills a general education requirement (GER) in math/science. Open ONLY to Honors College students

*Bio 105: Ecology and Evolution – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the scientific process, evolutionary theory, speciation, elementary genetics, and the ecology of populations, communities, and ecosystems.

*Bio 105L: Ecology and Evolution Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 105 – Ecology and Evolution.

*Bio 110: Introduction to Environmental Science – 3 credit hours

Basic ecological concepts and the physical/biological principles underlying environmental issues; deals with topics such as population, pollution, resources; discusses the historical, cultural, geographical, economic, and behavioral roots of environmental problems; models how to take personal and political action on behalf of the environment. NOT OPEN TO BIOLOGY MAJORS

*Bio 112: Introduction to Human Nutrition – 3 credit hours

Nutrition is the science of food. Students will be introduced to the six classes of nutrients, how the body utilizes the nutrients, and the role that good nutrition plays in good health. Other topics such as the impact of poor or under-nutrition during important stages of human development or the specialized dietary requirements for athletes may also be included. Prerequisite: Ability to do basic math, including percentages.

*Bio 115: Molecular and Cellular Biology – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the study of life at the molecular and cellular level, this course covers basic cell structure and function, biochemistry for the life sciences, basic molecular biology, and introductory genetics, including information flow from DNA to protein; and cellular utilization of energy, including cell respiration and photosynthesis.

*Bio 115L: Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 115 – Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Bio 120: Medical Terminology – 3 credit hours

This course examines the specialized vocabulary used in medicine and science. By understanding root elements to which prefixes and suffixes are added, the student will be able to construct and analyze unfamiliar words to uncover their meanings.

Bio 201: Human Anatomy and Physiology – 3 credit hours

An integrated study of human anatomy and physiology for biology and pre-professional allied health majors, using a body systems approach that emphasizes interrelationships between form and function at gross and microscopic levels of organization. Course content includes basic anatomical and directional terminology; fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology; and study of major body systems, including skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, endocrine, immune, and reproductive systems. Prerequisites: Bio 115 and Chm 102 OR Chm 100 required.

Bio 201L: Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 201 – Human Anatomy and Physiology. Includes fundamental concepts and principles of anatomy and physiology from investigation of cell, tissue, and organ levels of several body systems, with special emphasis on skeletal, muscular, nervous, and circulatory systems. A large portion of the semester will focus on cat anatomy.

*Bio 215: Biological Diversity – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the study of life at the organismal level that includes a survey of life in all six kingdoms, with emphasis on plants and animals, as well as a study of comparative structures and functions. Prerequisite: Bio 105.

*Bio 215L: Biological Diversity Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 215 – Biological Diversity.

*Bio 300: Genetics – 3 credit hours

General principles and problems of heredity surveying transmission genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Prerequisites: Bio 115; ability to use algebra or statistical analysis.

*Bio 300L: Genetics Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 300 – Genetics.

*Bio 301: Developmental Biology – 3 credit hours

Molecular and cellular basis for differentiation and morphological changes occurring during development. Model systems are used for insight into vertebrate development. Prerequisites: Bio 215 and 300.

*Bio 301L: Developmental Biology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 301 – Developmental Biology

Bio 305: Advanced Anatomy and Physiology – 3 credit hours

Exploration of fundamental topics in mammalian anatomy and physiology as a basis of human disease. Uses a case study approach to integrate current primary literature and application of diagnostic medical procedures. Prerequisites: Bio 201 and Chm 302; may take Chm 302 concurrently.

Bio 305L: Advanced Anatomy and Physiology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 305 – Advanced Anatomy and Physiology.

Bio 311: Microbiology – 3 credit hours

Study of basic concepts of microbial biology, including cell morphology, biochemistry, genetics, taxonomy, and ecology. Emphasis is on prokaryote growth/metabolism, culture, isolation, identification, and medical application in disease. Prerequisites: Bio 115 and 201; Chm 301 recommended.

Bio 311L: Microbiology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 311 – Microbiology. Covers the basic fundamentals of microbial sterile technique and axenic culture, with emphasis on microscopic, staining, and metabolic diagnostic tests for identification of prokaryotes.

Bio 312: Parasitology – 3 credit hours

This course is an introduction to parasites, with a focus on human parasites and the animal parasites of economic importance. The biology of significant protozoans, helminthes, and arthropods will be discussed, and their cell biology, life cycles, host-parasite relationships, epidemiology, and control will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Bio 201 recommended.

Bio 321: Reading List – 1–3 credit hours

Reports or discussions of topical fundamentals in which the student is deficient, and/or readings in classical or special interest biology literature.

*Bio 325: Ecology – 3 credit hours

Study of how plants and animals interact with each other and with their environment; includes selected topics related to environmental problems such as pollution, energy, resources, and population. Prerequisite: Bio 105.

*Bio 325L: Ecology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 325 – Ecology.

Bio 330: Immunology – 3 credit hours

The biological basis for the understanding of the molecular and cellular features of the mammalian immune system. Includes study of role of non-specific (innate) and specific (adaptive) systems in providing immunity to disease, and the topics of hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmunity, vaccination, and transplant rejection. Prerequisites: Bio 201 and Chm 302 (Chm 302 may be taken concurrently); Bio 311 recommended.

Bio 399: Independent Study – 1–4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum; it is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

Bio 401: Advanced Cell Biology – 3 credit hours

Detailed study of the cell as the basic unit of life, focusing on the interplay of biochemistry and genetics in regulation of eukaryotic cell processes. Prerequisites: Bio 115, 201; Chm 301 and 302.

Bio 401L: Advanced Cell Biology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 401 – Advanced Cell Biology.

Bio 403: Rotating Biological Topics – 1–3 credit hours

Topics covered will vary by course instructor and dependent on the needs of enrolled students. Examples of possible topics include Pacific NW Ecology, Entomology, and Cancer Biology. See academic advisor for current topic being offered.

Bio 403L: Rotating Biological Topics Laboratory – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with BIO 403 – Rotating Biological Topics. See academic advisor for current topic being offered.

Bio 405: Directed Research – 1–4 credit hours

Directed laboratory/library projects for senior biology majors of demonstrated superior ability. Admission by recommendation only.

Bio 417: Molecular Biology – 1–4 credit hours

Current molecular biology topics. Emphasis is on the function of the genetic material and consequences of altered function on gene products and on familiarization with common molecular biological techniques that will be encountered by students in graduate school or medical research. Prerequisites: Bio 300; Chm 301, and 302.

Bio 417L: Molecular Biology Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Bio 417 – Molecular Biology.

Bio 425: Marine Biology – 3 credit hours

Introduction to marine ecosystems and their physical/chemical/biological properties; survey of marine plants and animals and their structural/functional adaptations; study of the effects of human intervention in the marine environment. Lab includes a required one-week trip.

Bio 425L: Marine Biology Lab – 1 credit hour

Chemical and physical properties of the ocean, invertebrate and vertebrate animals, phytoplankton and plants. Includes a mandatory one-week trip to marine ecosystems in Florida.

Bio 499: Biology Seminar – 1 credit hour

A capstone course whose content varies according to student need/interest. May include student research, comprehensive review of the discipline, presentation of library research papers, visiting lecturers, field trip, or study of special topics. Prerequisite: Senior status.

Chemistry

*GER Approved Course

*Chm 100: Introduction to Chemistry – 3 credit hours

Basic chemistry, including an introduction to geology. Laboratory. Does not apply to a chemistry major.

*Chm 101: General Chemistry I – 3 credit hours

Fundamental laws, theories, and concepts of modern chemistry. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week.

*Chm 101L: General Chemistry I Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 101 – General Chemistry I.

Chm 102: General Chemistry II – 3 credit hours

Intensive treatment of the principles of chemistry with analytical study of the anions and cations. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: Chm 101 or instructor consent.

Chm 102: General Chemistry II Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 102 – General Chemistry II. Prerequisite: Chm 101L.

Chm 205: Quantitative Analysis – 3 credit hours

Theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Laboratory practice in the identification of unknowns. Methods of calculation used in analysis are emphasized. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chm 101and 102.

Chm 205L: Quantitative Analysis Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 205 – Quantitative Analysis

Chm 301: Organic Chemistry I – 3 credit hours

Fundamentals of modern organic chemistry with emphasis on bonding, mechanism, stereo-chemistry, analysis, and synthesis of organic compounds. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chm 101 and 102.

Chm 301L: Organic Chemistry I Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 301 – Organic Chemistry I. Prerequisite: Chm 102L.

Chm 302: Organic Chemistry II – 3 credit hours

Continuation of modern organic chemistry with emphasis on bonding, mechanism, stereo-chemistry, analysis, and synthesis of organic compounds. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chm 301.

Chm 302L: Organic Chemistry II Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 302 – Organic Chemistry II. Prerequisite: Chm 301L.

Chm 307: Problems in Chemistry I – 2-3 credit hours

Introduction to research for advanced students in chemistry.

Chm 308: Problems in Chemistry II – 2-3 credit hours

Continued research for advanced students in chemistry.

Chm 320: Inorganic Chemistry – 3 credit hours

Survey of atomic structure, descriptive chemistry of selected elements, periodic relationships, chemical bonding, nomenclature, aqueous and non-aqueous chemistry, and coordination complexes. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: Chm 102 and 205.

Chm 350: Physical Chemistry – 3 credit hours

Elementary principles of thermodynamics; modern theories of atomic and molecular structure; kinetics and various equilibria of chemical importance, with an emphasis on biochemical applications. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Four semesters of chemistry; mathematics through calculus; general physics.

Chm 350L: Physical Chemistry Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 350 – Physical Chemistry.

Chm 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

Chm 405: Directed Research – 2 credit hours

Directed laboratory/library projects for senior chemistry majors and minors of demonstrated superior ability.  Admission by recommendation only.

Chm 409: Biochemistry I – 3 credit hours

Chemistry of proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and other biomolecules. Emphasis on structure and function of biochemical processes. Three lectures and one lab period per week. Prerequisites: Chm 301 and 302.

Chm 409L: Biochemistry I Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 409 – Biochemistry.

Chm 410: Biochemistry II – 3 credit hours

Chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, and other biomolecules. Emphasis on reaction pathways and other biochemical processes. Three lectures weekly. Prerequisites: Chm 301 and 302.

Chm 410L: Biochemistry II Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with Chm 410 – Biochemistry II.

Chm 499: Chemistry Seminar – 1 credit hour

This course is an introduction to chemical literature and chemistry information systems. Prerequisite: Senior status.

Communication Sciences and Disorders

CSD 240: Introduction to Communication Disorders – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the most advanced of neurological functions, human communication.  An emphasis will be placed on the knowledge of the profession and the disordered populations served by speech-language pathologists and audiologists. The course will include an introductory look at the American Speech Language and Hearing Association’s code of ethics and scope of practice. A total of 25 clinical observation hours (field experience) will be required for this course.

CSD 250: Language Development – 3 credit hours

An introduction to language acquisition across the lifespan, with an emphasis on basic concepts, theories of development, and consideration of language differences in multicultural diverse populations. Pre-requisite: CSD 240.

CSD 262: Phonetics –  3 credit hours

A study of speech sounds and associate International Phonetic Alphabet symbol as they relate to applications to normal and disordered populations, with practical experience in transcription provided. Recommendation: Ideally this course would be taken in conjunction with Eng 306 – Linguistics.

CSD 263: Articulation Disorders – 3 credit hours

An introduction to the basic foundation for the normal acquisition of speech sounds and their phonetic characteristics.  In addition, articulation and phonological disorders in children will be included for the purposes of diagnosis, and management in a diverse multi-cultural society. Prerequisite: CSD 262.

CSD 266: Anatomy and Physiology – 3 credit hours

A comprehensive study of the anatomical and physiological processes and their related functions for the normal development of speech, language, hearing, and swallowing.

CSD 274: Introduction to Clinical Practice – 2 credit hours

An introduction to clinical experience reflecting on pre-clinical expectations of various clinical settings, report and goal writing, for various communication, cognitive, and swallowing disorders. Prerequisite: CSD 240.

CSD 300: Articulation and Phonological Disorders – 3 credit hours

A study of normal and disordered speech production. The course content includes the diagnosis and treatment of articulation and phonological disorders, phonological theories, phonetic characteristics, sound acquisition, and speech differences in a multicultural society. Prerequisite: CSD 262.

CSD 363: Audiology – 3 credit hours

Introduction to anatomy and physiology of hearing; hearing science; pure tone audiometric test interpretation; audiogram interpretation; and the nature, degree, and prevention of hearing loss.

CSD 364: Aural Rehabilitation – 3 credit hours

A study of the development of the auditory function, auditory dysfunction, and multisensory approach to rehabilitation. Introductory knowledge of amplification and assistive listening devices. Prerequisite: CSD 363.

CSD 370: Language Disorders – 3 credit hours

A study of language-disordered populations across the lifespan, including issues in prevention, with practical application for diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisite: CSD 250.

CSD 374: Clinical Practicum I – 2 credit hours

A clinical practicum experience that enables students in the area of Speech Pathology to obtain supervised, hands-on practicum experiences in various communication, cognitive, swallowing, and hearing disorders. This clinical practicum consists of 30 contact hours within pediatric and school-based populations, monthly meetings, and outside assignments. This course is required for all CSD majors. Prerequisites: CSD 274.

CSD 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This elective course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

CSD 415: Speech and Hearing Science – 3 credit hours

Introduction to a basic understanding of acoustics, and of the acoustics involved in speech production and speech perception processes as they relate to the anatomy and physiology of the human speech production mechanism. Prerequisite: CSD 262.

CSD 460: Diagnostic Procedures – 3 credit hours

This course provides the basic foundations of the principles and practices commonly used by professionals in the assessment of communication, cognitive, voice, and swallowing disorders. Experience in the use of standardized and non-standardized instruments with subsequent report and goal writing will be addressed. Prerequisites: CSD 262, 266, 363, and 370.

CSD 467: Voice and Fluency Disorders – 3 credit hours

Introduction to voice and fluency disorders across the lifespan, including theory, anatomical and physiological basis, as well as characteristics of the various disorders.  Diagnosis and management will be included in discussion. Prerequisites: CSD 415.

CSD 470: Neuroanatomy – 3 credit hours

The study of the structure, organization and development of the central nervous system with a detailed study of the neurology of speech, language, swallowing and cognition. Case studies will be reviewed with discussion on various diseases, illnesses and injury to the central nervous system. Prerequisites: CSD 266 and Junior/Senior status.

CSD 474: Clinical Practicum II – 2 credit hours

A clinical practicum experience that enables students in the area of Speech Pathology to obtain supervised, hands-on advanced practicum experiences in various communication, cognitive, swallowing, and hearing disorders. This practicum consists of monthly meetings, outside assignments, and 30 contact hours within more complex pediatric and geriatric populations in acute care, rehab, long-term care, and/or other clinical settings. This course is required for all CSD majors. Prerequisite: CSD 274 and 470.

Computer Science

*GER Approved Courses

*CS101: Introduction to Computers – 1 credit hour

This course is a part of the core for a degree in computer science and serves as a roadmap for the rest of the computer courses that students will take. It will provide an overview of the architecture and organization of a computer, such as the CPU, memory, I/O organization, and peripherals. From this course, students will learn the basics of computer architecture and is designed for those with no prior computing experience. This course is also open to non-majors. Prerequisite: None.

*CS103: Fundamentals of Programming – 2 credit hours

This is an entry-level programming course designed to teach the basics of program design, coding, and testing. It presents students with methods of structured problem-solving and modular logic so they can become conversant with these skills before learning syntax and programming code in a specific language. Students will be introduced to hierarchy charts, flow charts, pseudo code, and IPO diagrams as well as different problem-solving techniques. Prerequisite: None.

*CS105: Office Applications – 3 credit hours

This course allows the student to learn to use word processing and presentation software. It allows students to present written materials in a professional and appealing manner. Students will learn how to apply the features of a presentation software program to design, create, and edit professional quality presentations. They will also learn word processing fundamentals include the features used with basic line, page, and document formatting. Topics include: creating, saving, retrieving, formatting, drawing, editing, and printing documents; changing fonts, creation of “slides” and “slideshows.” graphics, tables, merging, sorting, columns, styles, document generation, macros, and appropriate application of each of these features to enhance the preparation and presentation of a variety of documents. It is designed for those with no prior programming experience. Prerequisite: None.

*CS 107: Electronic Spreadsheets – 1 credit hour

The course allows students to learn how to use a spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel®. It will explore topics such as spreadsheet layout and terminology, totals, charting, report generation, how to enhance a worksheet and chart, and how to manipulate formulas. Students will examine sample files, videos, and books that will enable them to gain practical knowledge about spreadsheets that can be used in daily life, either at work, school, or home. Prerequisite: None.

*CS 108: Internet Technology – 1 credit hour

This course, designed for those with no prior programming experience, provides a broad introduction to the Internet and its resources, with emphasis on using the World Wide Web to locate, transfer, and publish information. Students will be taught specifically how to design and code HTML programs, which will allow them to create websites. Prerequisite: None.

*CS 109: Databases – 1 credit hour

This course provides an introduction to a database software such as Access®. A hands-on course, it helps students develop general knowledge of database design, development, and administration as well as application development, using a microcomputer database management system. Students will learn how to develop a database including tables, queries, forms, and reports. Prerequisite: None.

*CS110: Programming I – 3 credit hours

This is an entry-level programming course (no prior programming experience needed) that introduces programming using a high-level language such as C++. Students will be taught how to design, code, debug, and document programs using structured techniques and good programming styles. Students will be able to sit the C Programming Language Certified Associate (CLA) certification exam. Prerequisite: Admission to any Mathematics course higher than Mth 006.  Co-requisite: CS 101, CS 103.

CS 111: Programming II – 3 credit hours

This course introduces the principles and practices of Object Oriented Programming, using at least two OOP languages such as C++ and JAVA. The course also continues to build on the students’ experience with control structures (i.e., selection, iteration, and recursion), data types (e.g. arrays, strings, pointers, and dynamic structures), and fundamental algorithms for operations such as sorting and searching. Students will be able to sit the C++ Certified Associate Programmer (CPA) certification exam. Prerequisite: CS 110.

CS 210: Data Structures and Algorithms – 3 credit hours

This course investigates the development and use of basic data structures and algorithms, which are used as tools in designing computer solutions to problems. It covers topics such as arrays, stacks, queues, trees, sorting, searching, and graphs. Students will become familiar with the specification, usage, implementation, and analysis of these data structures and algorithms. Prerequisites: CS 111, Mth 103.

CS 220: Computers Ethics – 3 credit hours

This course examines the ethical issues that arise as a result of the increasing use of computers, and the responsibilities of those who work with computers either as computer science professionals or end users. The course stresses the ways in which computers challenge traditional ethical and philosophical concepts, and the way they raise old issues in a new way. The aim of the course is to study the basis for ethical decision-making and the methodology for reaching ethical decisions concerning computing matters so that students will be able to think critically, arguing for and/or against a particular approach or idea. Prerequisite: Eng101; recommended: Eng102.

CS 312: Software Analysis and Data Design – 3 credit hours

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to systems analysis and database design. It provides students with the skills to identify business problems that may be solved by technology-based solutions, to determine requirements for information systems solutions, and to develop designs – based on a SDLC model – that form the basis for implementing systems. Students are introduced to a strong foundation in systems analysis and design concepts, methodologies, techniques, and tools such as relational Algebra, UML, and SQL; they then apply these theories and principles in the designing of a working database system. Prerequisite: None; recommended: Eng101.

CS 320: Operating Systems – 3 credit hours

This course looks at the internal operations and fundamental principles of modern operating systems. Students learn how an operating system manages both system resources and asynchronous concurrent events. Topics include processes/threads, CPU scheduling, synchronization, deadlocks, memory management, virtual memory, file systems, I/O systems, protection, and security. Students also learn how to operate in different operating systems such as Linux and Mac to understand basic user-level skills in order to use of advanced operating system features. Prerequisite: CS 110; recommended: CS 210.

CS 330: Theory of Computation – 3 credit hours

This course addresses questions like What kind of problems can be algorithmically solved? and What are the limits of what a computer can compute? Students are introduced to a variety of issues in the mathematical development of computer science theory, particularly finite representations for languages and machines and Turing Machines. They also learn to determine the complexity and computability of algorithms, thereby obtaining insights into the capabilities and limitations of the computing machines. Prerequisites: Mth 103 and Mth 211.

CS 335: Artificial Intelligence – 3 credit hours

This course provides students with the most fundamental concepts and techniques underlying the construction of intelligent computer systems. It covers topics such as computer agents, problem solving, uncertainty, learning, and search strategies. Areas of application such as knowledge representation and expert systems will be explored. The course will thus provide the necessary framework for further study and research in the field. Prerequisites: CS 110 and Mth 103; recommended: CS 210.

CS 351: Computer Modeling and Simulation – 3 credit hours

The course introduces the basic concepts of computation through modeling and simulation that are increasingly being used to shorten design cycles, innovate new products, and evaluate designs and simulate the impacts of alternative approaches. Students learn different modeling methods and conduct a detailed examination of four problem-solving aspects: finding and gathering necessary information, envisioning an appropriate model to address desired goals, implementing the model using appropriate software tools (spreadsheets, statistical packages, symbolic manipulators, simulation packages, programming languages), and testing/analyzing the model. Prerequisites: Mth 211 and CS 110.

CS 370: Data Communication and Networking – 3 credit hours

This course, an introduction to fundamental principles of computer communications, provides an overview of the design and implementation of computer communication networks by looking at different network architectures and design principles as well as the procedures and rules involved in the communication process and, most importantly, the software that controls computers communication. The course also examines different communication technologies and protocols suites such as TCP/IP. Prerequisite: CS 101.

CS 385: Computer Organization and Architecture – 3 credit hours

This course is a follow-up to CS101 that overviewed the architecture and organization of a computer. It helps students understand the basic operation of computing hardware, how it works and interfaces to software. As a result, students reach a high-level understanding of the role played by compilers, assemblers, instruction sets, and hardware. The course will also introduce students to system-level programming, which helps students in debugging programs written in high-level languages.  Prerequisites: CS 101 and Mth 103.

CS 399: Independent/Directed Study – 3 credit hours

This is an elective self-directed course designed to give students who have completed basic courses an opportunity to pursue original research in a chosen computer science topic not offered in the curriculum. The course may include directed readings, applied work, assisting the faculty member with a research project, carrying out an independent research project, or other activities deemed appropriate by the supervising faculty member and the department. Regardless of the nature of the experience, the work must culminate in a formal paper. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Prerequisite: Junior status; faculty approval.

CS 410: Computer Topics – 3 credit hours

This is a seminar-based course designed to explore advanced and/or emerging topics in the computer science discipline. Topics identify current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Prerequisite: Junior status; faculty approval.

CS 420: Web and Mobile App Programming – 3 credit hours

Mobile devices and the Internet have become a prominent part of daily lives, and people have come to rely on them for on-the-go information. At present, Mobile devices outnumber desktop and laptop computers approximately three-to-one worldwide. This course teaches students how to build applications for different mobile operating platforms such as Android and iOS. It also introduces them to programming professional web applications using languages such as XHTML, CSS, PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and Ajax, providing them with the skills to analyze and use them appropriately in the designing of web solutions.  Prerequisite: CS 111.

CS 440: Programming Languages – 3 credit hours

A capstone programming course, this provides students with the working knowledge of the basic principles underlying the design of different families of programming languages such as Imperative, Object-Oriented, Functional, Scripting, and, Logical; each of these has their own strengths and weaknesses that make them attractive to a variety of problem domains. This course allow students to examine different families based on different concepts such as the language’s computational model, syntax, semantics, and pragmatic considerations that shape it. Students use the programming languages learned in their courses to perform these examinations. Prerequisites: CS 312, CS 335, CS 420.

CS 490: Programming Projects Seminar for Minors – 3 credit hours

This course, designed as the capstone experience for students completing the CS minor, is an integrative course drawing on all of the courses that students have taken, including both general education and CS courses. Students are required to do in-class presentations by reading current research or survey papers and applying their computer science knowledge to solving a substantial real-world problem, resulting in the submission of a product (i.e. software, documentation) or a written paper (the thesis) and a public presentation. This course does not count toward the computer science major. Prerequisite: Declared Computer Science Minor.

CS 495: Computer Science Internship – 1-3 credit hours

The internship experience gives students an opportunity to integrate theory and practice by working in a supervised professional setting. The chosen internship, designed in collaboration with the CS faculty sponsor and the Career Services Office, should be located at an offcampus facility and students enrolled will be individually supervised by faculty who will guide the student’s experience to maximize learning. The course will be offered to students during the academic year of their junior year and the summer and first semester of their senior year. To earn one (1) credit hour, student must complete forty (40) hours of field work. Prerequisite: Junior status.

CS 497: Senior Seminar I – 1 credit hour

This course is designed as the first part of the capstone research experience for students, integrating all of the courses that students have taken, including both general education and major courses. Students are required to do in-class presentations by reading current research or survey papers and synthesizing and applying their computer science knowledge in order to solve a substantial real-world problem. This results in a research proposal. Prerequisite: Completed junior year.

CS 498: Senior Seminar II – 1 credit hour

This completes the senior seminar for Computer Science majors and must be taken in conjunction with CS499 – Senior Project. Students are required to do in-class presentations by reading current research or survey papers and providing a forum for discussion of senior project expectations, development and progress. The course culminates in the creation of a product report for the software created in CS499 – Senior Project or a written paper (the thesis). Prerequisite: CS 497.  Co-requisite: CS 499.

CS 499: Senior Project – 1 credit hour

This senior course allows students to complete a capstone project and serves as a culmination of their studies within the major. The project entails the implementation of the research proposal created in CS498 – Senior Seminar I. Students work typically through teams designing, implementing, and testing the solution to the specific problem. Each team is supervised by a designated faculty. The senior project concludes with the submission of a product (i.e. software, documentation) or a written paper (the thesis) and a public presentation. Prerequisite: CS 497.  Co-requisite: CS 498.

Mathematics

*GER Approved Course

Mth 005: Basic Math I –  3 credit hours

In this course, a student 1) develops a fundamental competency in computations using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percentages; 2) is introduced to real numbers and algebraic expressions; 3) solves one variable linear equations and inequalities; 4) graphs linear equations in two variables including slope and intercept form; and 5) solves problems involving the graphing of inequalities in two variables. Does not apply toward degree requirements. A grade of “C” or better is required to enroll in Mth 006. Tutorial sessions required. Prerequisite: ACT math score of 16 or below.

Mth 006: Basic Math II – 3 credit hours

In this course, the student 1) learns to solve systems of equations and inequalities; 2) finds perimeters, areas, surface areas, and volumes of geometric figures; 3) manipulates polynomials including factoring and solving equations; 4) simplifies and solves rational expressions and equations; and 5) simplifies and solves quadratic expressions and equations. A grade of “C” or better is required to enroll in a college algebra or equivalent course. Tutorial sessions may be required. Prerequisite: Mth 005 or ACT math score of 17 or 18.

*Mth 101: Mathematics for Liberal Arts – 3 credit hours

A brief survey of mathematical topics that have shaped and continue to shape our lives. The course emphasizes individual development in three areas: proficiency in basic skills and calculations, interpretation and appreciation of mathematical applications, and enhancement of quantitative reasoning and problem solving abilities. Prerequisite: Math ACT 19 or above, or at least a C in Mth 006.

*Mth 102: Mathematics and Truth – 3 credit hours

Mathematics offers many insights into truth — from mathematical methodology to mathematical application. This course examines the interplay of mathematics and truth from a variety of perspectives: historical, scientific, and philosophical. Prerequisite: Math ACT 19 or above, or at least a C in Mth 006.

*Mth 103: Discrete Mathematics – 3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to discrete mathematics, including discussion of sets, integers, properties of integers, graphs, trees, discrete probability, Boolean algebra, and logical structures. Prerequisite: Math ACT 19 or above, or at least a C in Mth 006.

*Mth 111: College Algebra and Trigonometry I – 3 credit hours

College algebra from the perspective of functions: linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic expressions and equations. This course is the intended preparatory course for more advanced study in mathematics — particularly calculus. Prerequisite: Math ACT 19 or above, or C or better in Mth 006.

*Mth 112: College Algebra and Trigonometry II – 3 credit hours

This course focuses primarily on topics from trigonometry: angles, the trigonometric functions, properties and graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, and applications of trigonometry. It is the intended preparatory course for more advanced study in mathematics — particularly calculus.  Prerequisite: Mth 111 or permission of instructor.

*Mth 113: Survey of Calculus – 3 credit hours

The course introduces students to differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite: Mth 111 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Mth 203: Fundamentals of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I – 3 credit hours

Designed for Elementary Education majors, this course explores the development of the basic structures and relationships of mathematics as they are relevant to the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: Math ACT 19 or above, or at least a C in Mth 006.

*Mth 204: Fundamentals of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II – 3 credit hours

This course — designed for Education majors — carefully reviews basic algebra and geometry and prepares the student to graph various types of functions and relations. It requires the student to learn many problem-solving techniques. A required writing assignment helps the student to learn how to synthesize ideas and concepts and present them in an organized manner. Prerequisite: Mth 203, at least a C in Mth 006, ACT 19, or permission of instructor.

*Mth 211: Calculus I – 4 credit hours

In-depth coverage of calculus appropriate for study in mathematics, science, engineering, or other quantitative disciplines. Covers functions, limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, and foundations of integral calculus. Prerequisites: Background equivalent to one year of college algebra and trigonometry. An ACT math score of at least 24 is recommended for students not taking the Mth 111–112 sequence prior to Mth 211.

*Mth 212: Calculus II –  4 credit hours

In-depth coverage of calculus appropriate for study in mathematics, science, engineering, or other quantitative disciplines. Covers integration techniques, applications of integration, sequences and series, and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: Mth 211.

Mth 213: Calculus III – 4 credit hours

In-depth coverage of calculus appropriate for study in mathematics, science, engineering, or other quantitative disciplines. Covers 3-dimensional geometry and extends ideas of calculus into higher dimensional settings. Prerequisite: Mth 212.

Mth 250: Statistics for Social Sciences – 3 credit hours

An introduction to statistical concepts and communications used in social science research at both the descriptive and inferential level in preparation for Psy 405, Psy 410; and Pls 405. Prerequisite: Mth 101, 102, 103, or 111.

Mth 305: Differential Equations – 3 credit hours

A study of the techniques, history, and applications of ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics included are linear equations, infinite series solutions, systems of linear equations, numerical techniques, and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Mth 213.

Mth 308: Linear Algebra – 3 credit hours

Geometric vectors, vector spaces, inner products, linear transformations, matrices with applications to solutions of systems of equations, linear transformations, and determinates. Prerequisite: Mth 211.

*Mth 310: Geometry – 3 credit hours

A study of congruence, parallelism, polygonal regions, inequalities, similarity, construction, projections, loci, and area and volume functions in Euclidean geometry and non-Euclidean geometries.

Mth 313: Probability and Statistics – 3 credit hours

Probability axioms, discrete and continuous distributions, expectation, multivariate distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: Mth 213.

Mth 320: Graph Theory – 3 credit hours

A study of graphs, digraphs, connectivity, trees, and maps with applications to advanced chemistry, biology, computer science, and operations research. Prerequisite: Mth 212.

Mth 340: Numerical Analysis – 3 credit hours

Numerical representation, solution of single non-linear equations, linear equations, interpolation and approximations of numerical methods of integration. Prerequisite: Mth 213.

Mth 350: History of Mathematics – 3 credit hours

The course objectives include the following four points: 1) developing a fundamental understanding of the evolution of mathematical thought during the last three thousand years; 2) learning the names, mathematical accomplishments, and thought processes of the great mathematicians of history; 3) developing proficiency in reading the works of the great mathematicians; 4) developing the ability to present modules of information about mathematics effectively to the class. Prerequisite: Mth 211.

Mth 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

Mth 400: Modern Algebra – 3 credit hours

An exposition of the structure of algebra through an examination of these structures: groups, rings, fields, and integral domains. Applications to theoretical computer science, biology, and chemistry. Prerequisite: Mth 213.

Mth 405: Advanced Calculus – 3 credit hours

Theoretical development of the foundations of calculus through the study of set theory, real numbers, metric spaces, Euclidean spaces, continuity, differentiation, integration, infinite series, and series of functions. Prerequisite: Mth 213.

Mth 415: Operations Research – 3 credit hours

Applications of the scientific method to the optimal management of human-nature-machine systems. Topics included are linear programming, sensitivity analysis, networks, inventory models, queues, integer, and nonlinear programming. Prerequisite: Knowledge of calculus and probability.

Mth 497: Senior Seminar I – 1 credit hour

Preparation of students for part I of the required Senior Exit Examination by summarizing and reviewing subjects in the Math/CS core program. It also provides a forum for discussion of senior project expectations and progress.

Mth 498: Senior Seminar II – 1 credit hour

Preparation of students for part II of the required Senior Exit Examination by summarizing and reviewing advanced Math/CS topics. It also provides a forum for discussion of senior project expectations and progress.

Mth 499: Senior Project – 1 credit hour

Required senior project in mathematics and/or computer science is to contain original contributions toward solving a substantive problem in the discipline and will be directed by a faculty mentor.

Physics

*GER Approved Course

*PhS 100: Introduction to Physics – 3 credit hours

A survey of basic physics and properties of matter. Laboratory.

*PhS 104: Elements of Astronomy – 3 credit hours

An introduction to astronomy, aspects of the sky, earth’s motion and time-keeping, the moon, eclipses, and the physical features of planets.

*PhS 105: Introduction to Geology – 3 credit hours

Introductory course in geology. Earth materials, minerals and rocks, geologic processes, and basic landforms of the earth. Laboratory includes identification of minerals and rocks and use of geologic maps. Laboratory.

*PhS 110: Integrated Physical Science – 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to core foundation concepts in physical science, including space science, earth systems, force and motion, and energy (light energy, heat energy, sound energy, electrical energy and magnetism). Practical hands-on activities will be strongly emphasized.

*PHS 150H: Great Ideas in Science: Essential Physics – 3 credit hours

This course explores the basic principles of physical science, the applications of these principles to our world, and the relation of science to philosophy, politics, and other aspects of human activity. Focusing on concepts and thinking, mathematics will be deemphasized but not eliminated. The course will also provide experience in logical and quantitative reasoning, laboratory experiments, and in data interpretation and analysis. Useful, interesting, and fun topics discussed may include: science and knowledge, motion and force, gravity, electricity and magnetism, energy, heat and disorder, waves, sound and music, light, atoms and molecules, earth, stars and galaxies, black holes, the universe and the big bang, nuclear bombs, unpredictability and chaos, relativity, quantum physics and uncertainty, and quantum computation. An overnight field trip will supplement lecture and discussion. This course fills a general education requirement (GER) in the math/science area. Open ONLY to Honors College students

PhS 201: General Physics I – 3 credit hours

A general course covering mechanics and heat. Prerequisite: Mth 211.

PhS 201L: General Physics I Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with PhS 201.

PhS 202: General Physics II – 3 credit hours

A continuation of PhS 201 covering electricity, magnetism, light, sound, and selected topics from atomic physics.

PhS 202L: General Physics II Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with PhS 202.

PhS 300: Modern Physics – 3 credit hours

Course covers relativity of time, relativity of length, photoelectric effect, line spectra, atomic spectra, lasers, x-ray production, and radioactivity. Prerequisites: PhS 201 and 202.

PhS 301: Electric Circuits and Electronics – 3 credit hours

Course covers circuit analysis, active devices, diodes, transistors, rectifiers, power supplies, amplifier circuits. Prerequisites: PhS 201 and 202.

PhS 301L: Electric Circuits and Electronics Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with PhS 301.

PhS 303: Analytical Mechanics – 3 credit hours

An intermediate course in mechanics stressing problem solving covering kinematics in one, two, or three dimensions, and the motion of coordinate systems. Prerequisites: PhS 201 and Mth 212.

PhS 305: Theory of Electricity and Magnetism – 3 credit hours

A lecture and problem-solving course covering current theory, field concepts, electrostatics, boundary value problems, Ampere’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and the electromagnetic equations. Prerequisites: PhS 202 and Mth 213.

PhS 350: Thermodynamics – 3 credit hours

Elementary principles of thermodynamics: modern theories of atomic and molecular structure; kinetics, and various equilibria of chemical importance. Prerequisites: Four semesters of chemistry; mathematics through calculus; PhS 201 and 202.

PhS 350L: Thermodynamics Lab – 1 credit hour

Generally taken with PhS 350.

PhS 399: Independent Study – 1-4 credit hours

This course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”