Brescia University’s Master of Science in Clinical Psychology program is designed to prepare students for various health care services. Direct and supportive services include diagnosis and treatment of an emotional, mental, anxiety, or addictive disorder that affects the function of individuals, groups, or families. The Master of Science in Clinical Psychology program prepares students to meet the educational and practicum requirements necessary to become licensed as a psychological associate (LPA) in the state of Kentucky. For licensed psychological associates who are ready to apply for the next level of licensure in Kentucky, Brescia University offers the additional coursework some students may need to become licensed as psychological practitioners.

For additional information, please contact Sagan Storm, Associate Director of Graduate Admissions, at 1-877-BRESCIA, 270-686-4240, or by e-mail at [email protected].

Back to TopAdmissions Process

Matriculated Student: Each MS in Clinical Psychology applicant must submit evidence of the following to the Brescia University Admissions Office:

  1. Completion of an online application.
  2. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution showing the completion of 12 credits in psychology courses with a minimum grade of C.
  3. GPA of 3.0 or above.
  4. Typed personal statement (3-4 pages).
  5. Students for whom English is a second language must meet the minimum acceptable score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL): 550 on the paper-based TOEFL or 79 on the iBT TOEFL.

Full admission requirements and personal statement guideline can be found in the University Catalog.

Baccalaureate Graduates of Brescia University:  Graduates of Brescia University with a bachelor’s degree are eligible to receive preferential acceptance.  Students who have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.50 may be automatically admitted into the MS in Clinical Psychology Program and do not have to submit a personal statement.  The following conditions apply:

  • The student completes an online application by the designated deadline;
  • The student applies for acceptance to the first semester following conferral of their bachelor degree from Brescia University (i.e., May graduates must apply for admission to the following fall semester; December graduates must apply for admission to the following spring semester);
  • There is space available in the program.

If the number of students who qualify for automatic admission exceeds the available space in the program, students will be accepted on the basis of ranked GPA.  For example, students with a GPA of 4.0 will be admitted first, 3.99 next, and so on.  Brescia University students who do not meet the requirements for automatic admission can still apply but will be required to submit the complete application package.

Back to TopPrerequisites

Applicants must hold an undergraduate degree from a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting association. Applicants must have completed 12 academic hours of psychology courses with a minimum grade of C.

Back to TopProgram Structure

Students are able to complete the program entirely online or take in-person classes on campus. Part-time and full-time options are available. Students also have the option to complete a thesis project as part of their degree requirement. Students intending to apply to a doctoral program are encouraged to complete the thesis option.

The entire program is 45 academic credit hours. Students complete 2 practicums: 300 hours will be completed in the student’s second semester and 300 hours in the final semester.

Back to TopCourses

PSY 500: Scientific and Professional Ethics and Standards

Students will apply the APA Code of Ethics to ethical and professional issues in clinical psychology such as privacy and confidentiality; interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary relationships; dual relationships; conflicts of interest; rights and responsibilities of clients; and ethical decision making.

PSY 510: Advanced Psychopathology

This course explores abnormal behavior. It addresses etiology and classification of mental disorders, with the major focus being on diagnostic criteria of the DSM and application to clinical practice.

PSY 520: Advanced Adult Development

This is an advanced survey of the theories, methods of inquiry, and research relevant to human psychological development, from young adulthood through older adulthood, in biological, neurological, cognitive, social, and emotional domains.

PSY 521: Advanced Child Development

This course offers an advanced survey of the theories, methods of inquiry, and research relevant to human psychological development, from birth to adolescence, in biological, neurological, cognitive, social, and emotional domains.

PSY 522: Substance Abuse and Addictions

This course is designed to review the current developments in the field of addictions, validity and reliability of commonly used assessment tools, evaluation of treatment methods, and discussion of comorbidity issues within addiction practice.

PSY 523: Expressive Therapies

This course explores the use of alternative therapeutic tools, including art, music, and movement. It includes discussion of spiritual approaches to care, including mindfulness, meditation, yoga, and tai-chi.

PSY 530: Research Methodology

This course provides instruction about experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, operational definitions of concepts, development of hypotheses, indicators of rigor, sampling, validity and reliability issues, examples of measurement instruments, and the protection of human subjects in research.

PSY 540: Statistics, with Lab

This course is a graduate-level review of the knowledge of statistics in the social sciences. Students will apply statistics in the analysis of psychological data. They will use descriptive and inferential statistics. The lab will provide hands-on application of data-handling software and analysis.

PSY 550: Clinical Assessment of Intellectual Functioning of the Individual

This course will teach the use of structured interview techniques and standardized measurement instruments to gather information and formulate impressions of cognitive functioning that inform treatment decisions.

PSY 560: Clinical Assessment of Emotional and Psychological Functioning of the Individual

In this course, students will develop skills of engagement, therapeutic rapport, clinical interview techniques, and standardized instruments to gather information and formulate impressions of emotional and psychological functioning that inform treatment decisions.

PSY 570: Psychopharmacology

This course explains the physiology associated with major medical and psychological disorders and the effect of psychopharmacology on neurocognitive functioning and psychological health.

PSY 580: Practicum in Assessment

Through experiential learning, students will apply assessment skills with sensitivity and compassion to their experiences in a clinical setting. Experiences will include the use of standardized assessment instruments. Requires 300 clock hours.

PSY 600: Theories and Systems of Psychotherapy

In this course, students will develop advanced understanding of theoretical approaches to counseling and psychotherapy, including fundamental concepts, assessment, client and counselor roles, cultural relevance, and intervention strategies/techniques. There will be an emphasis on empirically supported approaches (e.g., CBT) and discussion of contraindicated approaches (e.g., conversion therapy).

PSY 610: Biological Bases of Behavior

This course provides an introduction to major concepts of physiological psychology. The objective of the course is to provide foundational knowledge about the influence of biological factors on behavior such as the brain-body connection and bio-psychological intervention.

PSY 620: Individual Differences

This course examines influences of culture and diversity on the understanding and practice of clinical psychology. Diversity includes not only culture and gender, but age, geographical location, social class, sexuality and other dimensions. Relevant clinical issues include cultural identity, testing and diagnostic assessment of culturally diverse clients, and psychotherapy issues.

PSY 630: Social Bases of Behavior

This course provides an introduction to major concepts of social behavior. The objective of the course is to provide knowledge of how thoughts, feelings, and behavior of the individual are influenced by the presence of others.

PSY 640: Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior

This course provides an introduction to major concepts of cognition and affect. The objective of the course is to provide foundational knowledge about the influence of cognitive-affective factors on behavior such as learning, thinking, motivation, and emotion.

PSY 650: Psychotherapy and Intervention I

In this course, students apply the selection, evaluation, and application of empirically supported interventions, including CBT and TLTD. Explores the use of telehealth.

PSY 660: Psychotherapy and Intervention II

In this course, students apply the selection, evaluation, and application of empirically supported interventions, including group therapy, marriage & family therapy; and assertive community treatment.

PSY 670: Practicum in Psychotherapy

This course provides experiential learning through clinical activities in an agency while being supervised by a licensed psychologist in an approved setting. Students will integrate classroom knowledge with clinical practice. Requires 300 clock hours.

PSY 690: Master Project/Thesis

This course requires an intensive research experience that allows students to construct and carry out their own research project as either an original study or a replication of a previously reported study, under the guidance of a Psychology faculty member. The final product should be a thesis that demonstrates a superior grasp on the process and outcomes of performing a research study.

PSY 695: Master Level Internship

The 150 hour Clinical Psychology Master’s Level Internship is designed to provide students with a professional experience that requires students to integrate the clinical psychology program’s training in a work setting that allows them to demonstrate proficiency in assessment and therapy in an ethical manner while promoting further growth in professional development and specialization.