Brescia University’s Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech-Language Pathology program is designed to prepare students for the growing field of speech and communication disorders and to train speech-pathologists to provide a full range of communicative services.The Master of Science (M.S.) education program in speech-language pathology {distance education} at Brescia University is a Candidate for Accreditation by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700. Candidacy is a “preaccreditation” status with the CAA, awarded to developing or emerging programs for a maximum period of 5 years.

For additional information, please call 270-686-4353 or email [email protected].

Back to TopAdmissions Process

All candidates are encouraged to apply. Candidates are vetted by the admissions committee. Conditional admission can be granted, and candidates meeting marginally low admission criteria can be considered by the committee.

Matriculated Student: Each Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech-Language Pathology applicant must submit evidence of the following to the Brescia University Admissions Office:

  1. Completion of an online application. Fall 2023 priority deadline is February 15, 2023
  2. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution showing the completion of a Communication Science and Disorders (CSD) undergraduate degree with grades of A or B in all major courses listed under CSD prerequisite courses or a non-CSD bachelor’s degree with grades of A or B in the following CSD prerequisite courses: phonetics; speech science; audiology; language development; CSD Anatomy and Physiology; CSD Neuroanatomy or CSD Neurology; and an introduction to CSD course (or other relevant CSD course). Non-CSD prerequisite courses that must be completed prior to program entry include: statistics; chemistry or physics; biology; and social/behavioral sciences. A grade of A or B is strongly recommended in the non-CSD prerequisites.
  3. GPA of 3.0 or above.
  4. Two letters of recommendations.
    1. Letters should be provided by instructors who are familiar with the applicant.
    2. A third letter is recommended but optional (unless requested by the admissions committee).
  5. Typed personal statement (3-4 pages), addressing the student’s:
    1. Ability to use distance learning technology;
    2. Motivations for applying to the program and career goals;
    3. Examples of when the student sought out supervision or consultation to resolve a difficult situation;
    4. Intentions for how to manage time in this rigorous program, which includes a practicum at least two days a week.
  6. An academic writing sample.
  7. Students for whom English is a second language must meet the minimum acceptable score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL): 550 on the paper-based TOEFL or 79 on the iBT TOEFL.

Applicants are selected based upon score, evaluation criteria, and availability of space. A third recommendation letter can be requested as determined by the SLP admissions committee. Personal interviews of candidates may be conducted as determined by the SLP admissions committee. These interviews are conducted through virtual technology to further rate students (if needed) based on oral communication skills and content of answers.

Baccalaureate Graduates of Brescia University:  Graduates of Brescia University’s undergraduate CSD program are eligible to receive preferential acceptance.  Students who have earned all A’s and B’s in courses within the major (with no course retakes to earn the A or B), have earned all A’s in their two clinical practicum courses (externship I and II), and have a minimum GPA of 3.00 or higher may be automatically admitted into the Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech-Language Pathology  Program and do not have to submit recommendation letters, personal statements, writing samples, or conduct an interview.  The following conditions apply:

  • The student completes an online application by the designated deadline;
  • The student applies for acceptance to the first cohort following conferral of their bachelor degree from Brescia University;
  • There is space available in the program.

If the number of students who qualify for automatic admission exceeds the available space in the program, students will be accepted on the basis of ranked GPA.  For example, students with a GPA of 4.0 will be admitted first, 3.99 next, and so on.  Brescia University students who do not meet the requirements for automatic admission can still apply but will be required to submit the complete application package.

Back to TopPrerequisites

Applicants who hold a Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) undergraduate degree from a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting association must have grades of A or B in all CSD prerequisite courses listed below. Students who have a bachelor’s degree in a different field, must have the following CSD prerequisites courses completed with an A or B grade.  A grade of A or B is strongly recommended in the non-CSD prerequisite courses. Definitions of these non-CSD prerequisite courses can be found at the following link: https://www.asha.org/Certification/Course-Content-Areas-for-SLP-Standards/.

Undergraduate level prerequisites include:

  • Prerequisite courses in CSD: (grade of A or B required)
    • CSD course in Phonetics
    • CSD course in Speech and Hearing Science
    • CSD course in Audiology
    • CSD course in Language Development
    • CSD course in Anatomy and Physiology
    • CSD course in Neuroanatomy or Neurology
    • CSD introductory course (or other relevant CSD course)

    Prerequisite courses that are non-CSD courses: (grade of A or B is strongly recommended)

    • Statistics
    • Chemistry or Physics
    • Biology
    • Social/Behavioral Sciences

    Definitions of these non-CSD prerequisite courses can be found on the following website: https://www.asha.org/Certification/Course-Content-Areas-for-SLP-Standards/.

  • Brescia University offers Communication Sciences and Disorders prerequisite courses online for students with bachelor’s degrees in other fields. Students can become eligible to apply for the M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology in as little as one year. Learn more at: Pre-SLP

Back to TopProgram Structure

All Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech-Language Pathology classes are taught online and are fifteen weeks long.

Classes meet weekly in real-time to provide maximum support and instruction to students. Students participate in a dynamic learning community and develop professional relationships that endure even after graduation.

The ASHA Code of Ethics can be found at: https://inte.asha.org/Code-of-Ethics/ 

Back to TopCourses

SLP 500: Speech Sound Disorders

This course covers acoustic characteristics of speech sounds, speech sound development, diagnostics, therapeutic interventions, prevention, and cultural competence. Disorders covered include motor-based speech sound disorders, phonological disorders, inconsistent speech sound disorder, and childhood apraxia of speech. This course includes an introduction to orofacial myology and accent reduction.

SLP 501: Clinical Observations in Speech-Language Pathology

This course is required for students who did not complete 25 observation hours through an undergraduate program or through prerequisite course work. Students will complete 25 observations hours with fully licensed, ASHA certified SLPs through onsite observations, through the online platform Master Clinician, or through a combination of those modes.

SLP 505: Research Methods

This course teaches students to be critical consumers of research. Students learn to locate scholarly research articles, to critique research, to identify independent and dependent variables, and to identify and explain research design. Students learn to identify research by levels of evidence, from levels of systematic reviews and randomized controlled trial studies to levels of poorly designed case studies and reports based on expert opinion.

SLP 510: Early Intervention

This course covers Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), a survey of early intervention systems across states, early childhood speech and language development, evaluation and therapeutic techniques for the birth to age three population, prevention of language disorders in this population, and service delivery models. Service delivery model topics include consultation, collaboration, coaching, direct and indirect intervention. Early communication topics include prelinguistic communication and paralinguistic communication

SLP 520: Seminar in Child Language

This course covers child language development, evaluation, and treatment of language disorders in children ages three to twenty-one. Topics include: receptive and expressive language, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, gestures, literacy, and language modalities. Social aspects of communication, including challenging behavior, ineffective social skills, and lack of communication opportunities are covered. Students learn to be critical consumers of standardized language testing products.

SLP 530: Fluency Disorders

This course covers fluency disorders across the lifespan. Students learn to diagnose, treat, and provide counseling for those with fluency disorders. Diagnoses include developmental stuttering, persistent stuttering, acquired stuttering, psychogenic stuttering, and cluttering.

SLP 540: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

This course explores adaptive and assistive technologies and modalities, and strategies to promote language and communication. Topics include assessment, program development, use and evaluation of technologies, and collaborative problem solving.

SLP 545: Professional Competency in Speech-Language Pathology

This is not a required course, but a remedial course that can be assigned to students who fail (or need to complete competency assessments due to extenuating or rare circumstances). To succeed in the graduate program, students must succeed within a dual system of course grades and competency assessments. Competency assessments occur in required courses and in the final semester of the program through a portfolio assessment. If a student fails any competency assessment on knowledge and skill acquisition (KASA) standards, faculty members may assign remedial coursework in a knowledge and/or skills area. Remedial coursework is designed specifically for the student on a student support plan document. Remedial coursework is completed in order to improve the student’s ability to pass a subsequent competency attempt.

SLP 550: Clinical Methods and Clinical Practicum I

In this clinical preparation course, introductory topics for the work setting are covered. These include: ethics and professional conduct, evidence-based practice principles, universal precautions, blood borne pathogens, patient confidentiality, principles of supervision in speech-language pathology, patient counseling and interviewing, diversity issues when working with diverse populations, and an introduction to clinical documentation processes. Students complete their first practicum placement, which is a part-time practicum of 75 patient contact hours in the second half of the semester. The placement occurs in a pediatric setting.

SLP 560: Voice Science and Disorders

This course teaches students anatomy and physiology of the larynx related to voice function including respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Students learn about perceptual voice assessment, videostroboscopic evaluations, aerodynamic and acoustical measurements, voice facilitation exercises, and collaboration with otolaryngology professionals.

SLP 565: Dysphagia

This course covers normal and disordered swallowing of the oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal stages. Laryngeal function, pulmonary issues, and gastrointestinal issues are discussed. Students learn how to diagnose and treat disorders of swallowing, especially in the adult population. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the swallowing mechanism, bedside swallowing evaluations, visualization instruments, manual exercises, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, deep brain stimulation, thermal-gustatory stimulation, and the Frazier water protocol. Students learn about medical conditions related to dysphagia. This course includes an introduction to orofacial myology and feeding disorders.

SLP 570: Motor Speech Disorders

This course covers adult apraxia of speech, types of dysarthria, and related neurological disorders. Students learn relevant anatomy and physiology related to motor speech disorders and relevant cranial nerve examination procedures. Students learn how to provide a differential diagnosis of dysarthria and apraxia. Students learn restoration and compensation approaches for motor speech disorders.

SLP 580: Thesis I

This course is an elective course for students completing the thesis option. The first stage of the thesis process involves narrowing a topic of interest, collecting information, and organizing information for a literature review. An edited, finalized literature review is completed.

SLP 599: Independent Study

This elective course designates a field of study that is not part of the regular curriculum. It is generally offered based on student interests and needs. Prerequisite: Submission and approval of “Application for Admission to Independent Study.”

SLP 600: Pediatric Dysphagia

This course covers feeding and swallowing disorders of children from infancy to adolescence. Topics include normal feeding and swallowing milestones, atypical feeding and swallowing development, medical disorders related to pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders, and prevention of feeding and swallowing disorders. Students learn how to evaluate, treat, and provide interdisciplinary services for these disorders.

SLP 610: Aphasia

In this course, students learn how to provide a differential diagnosis of aphasia, and how to treat aphasia through compensation and restoration therapeutic techniques. Topics include related medical conditions including stroke and head injury.

SLP 620: Cognitive Aspects of Communication

In this course, students learn about the assessment and treatment of cognitive-linguistic disorders and their related medical conditions. Topics include dementia, brain injury, and neurologic disorders. Cognitive aspects of communication includes attention, memory, sequencing, problem solving, and executive functioning.

SLP 630: Clinical Practicum II

In clinical practicum II, students complete 125-150 clinical hours evaluating and treating patients in a supervised pediatric setting. Students will complete assigned readings, discussions, and projects to support their clinical learning experiences.

SLP 635: Clinical Practicum III

In clinical practicum III, students complete 125-150 clinical hours evaluating and treating patients in a supervised geriatric setting. Students will complete assigned readings, discussions, and projects to support their clinical learning experiences.

CSD 640: Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation Topics for the SLP

This course explores the latest research in hearing science, audiometry, aural habilitation, and rehabilitation. Topics include hearing assessments, hearing aids, cochlear implants, classroom acoustics, oral and manual approaches to communication, the impact of hearing loss on speech and language development, and collaboration among professionals for patients with hearing loss.

SLP 650: Education and Healthcare Topics for the SLP

This course covers legalities relevant to the practice of speech-language pathology in education and healthcare settings. Topics include laws, regulations, due process, documentation, and payer systems.

SLP 670: Thesis II

This is an elective course for students completing the thesis option. In this stage, students submit a finalized methodology section of the thesis paper. It includes a discussion of potential participants, how participants will be recruited, informed consent forms, any instruments used, what data will be collected, how data will be collected, and how data will be analyzed. The project will be submitted to Brescia University’s IRB for approval.

SLP 660: Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology

This course covers professional issues as well as advocacy and leadership topics for the future speech-language pathologist. Students will identify and research current trends and issues within the Practicum of speech-language pathology and develop actions plans. Students will learn principles of leadership, complete a self-assessment, and develop an action plan related to their growth in leadership skills.

SLP 675: Thesis III

This is an elective course for students completing the thesis option. In this stage, students collect the data and complete the analysis, results, and discussion sections of the paper.

SLP 680: Seminar in Private Practice

This is an elective and advanced course in business aspects of private practice. Topics include business structure, policies and procedures, business filing, networking with insurance, marketing, electronic medical records, referral processes, and payer systems.

SLP 685: Seminar in Literacy

This is an elective and advanced course in literacy. This course explores the latest research in literacy assessment and intervention as well as the SLP’s expanded role in literacy.

SLP 690: Advanced Seminar in Orofacial Myology

This is an elective and advanced course in orofacial myology. This course offers an advanced exploration of how structure and function relates to the development and remediation of speech and swallowing disorders.

SLP 695: Seminar in Autism

This is an elective and advanced course in autism. This course explores the latest research in autism related to its diagnosis and treatment, especially those interventions related to the practice of speech-language pathology.

MSW 512: Death and Dying

The study of death and dying in American society; changes in attitudes and norms; future trends; services to clients and families. Course may be taken as either undergraduate or graduate elective but not in both programs.

Back to TopAccreditation

Brescia University’s Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech-Language Pathology program is designed to prepare students for the growing field of speech and communication disorders and to train speech-pathologists to provide a full range of communicative services.The Master of Science (M.S.) education program in speech-language pathology {distance education} at Brescia University is a Candidate for Accreditation by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700. Candidacy is a “preaccreditation” status with the CAA, awarded to developing or emerging programs for a maximum period of 5 years.

Students and stakeholders can submit complaints to the program’s accrediting body, the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. Criteria and submission requirements for complaints against programs and the CAA can be found at the following link: https://caa.asha.org/programs/complaints/

Back to TopStudent Achievement Outcome Data

Student Achievement Outcome Data

Back to TopLicensure Information

State requirements and contact information can be found at https://www.asha.org/advocacy/state/.

Back to TopCredentialing Information

Credentialing information for the Certificate of Clinical Competence can be found at https://www.asha.org/certification/.

Back to TopStrategic Plan

Strategic Plan

Fall 2022 Strategic Plan Report